EAL advice & training

First language assessments

Polish-English Interpretation & Teaching

 

Recent Posts from my Blog

  • You must come for dinner – reporting to EAL parents

    You must come for dinner – reporting to EAL parents

    “You must come for dinner”. I doubt this phrase will be used during the parents’ evening, but let’s face it – it is not a real invitation, it’s just being polite.   Much has been said in papers and online about the British and their use of language and euphemisms. It is quite funny, as it Read More ...Read More »
  • Kacper still does not talk to us

    Kacper still does not talk to us

    "Kacper still does not talk to us", a worried nursery worker said to me. "Could you talk to him in Polish, maybe he will feel better then".   I took  pictures of  some well-known Polish bedtime cartoons. When Kacper saw the little black mole, his eyes lit up. "Krecik, krecik" (mole, mole), he pointed excitedly Read More ...Read More »
  • Can visual notes be an aid to EAL Learners?

    Can visual notes be an aid to EAL Learners?

    I cannot draw. My spaceship looks like a fish. This can be a hindrance if you work with the EAL (English as an Additional Language) learners. But, I am a big supporter of presenting information in a visual way, as it allows children to understand and process new information. It also allows them to express Read More ...Read More »
  • Utilising the culture of EAL learners in the classroom

    Utilising the culture of EAL learners in the classroom

    So many teachers are interested in their EAL learners’ cultural background. Most  Polish children, who attended a Polish school, will know the legend of the Wawel dragon (Legenda o Smoku Wawelskim) or the Locomotive poem full of  wonderful huffing, puffing, whistling and whizzing onomatopoeic sounds (Lokomotywa). Many Polish books have been awarded literary prizes, the Read More ...Read More »
  • How does your Polish change when you are an immigrant?

    How does your Polish change when you are an immigrant?

    I have always remembered a Polish actress, who, after having spent a short time in America, appeared on the national Polish television. She spoke with a very prominent American accent, could not find Polish words, was hesitant and used a lot of pauses and non-lexical  fillers like hmmm, ah, eh. Ok, she was an actress, Read More ...Read More »